Finland says the number of people entering the country from Russia has increased

Finnish officials say the number of Russians entering through the eastern border of the country has increased, but the situation is still under control.

“The number has clearly increased,” said Matti Pitkaniitty, international affairs officer at the Finnish Border Guard. Reuters today. “It’s an unusual number, indicating more overcrowding.”

According to Pitkaniitty, the number of Russians arriving in Finland across the eastern border on September 21 was 4,824, higher than 3,133 a week earlier.





Cars with Russian number plates wait to pass through the Nuijamaa border control point between Russia and Finland in the city of Lappeenranta, Finland, on September 19.  Photo: AFP.

Cars with Russian number plates wait to pass through the Nuijamaa border control point between Russia and Finland in the city of Lappeenranta, Finland, on September 19. Image: AFP.

Pitkaniitty made the comments after Russian President Vladimir Putin on September 21 announced an order to “partially mobilize”, summoning a reserve force, mainly retired servicemen with military expertise and experience. . The Russian military is expected to mobilize an additional 300,000 servicemen in reserve to serve in the military operation in Ukraine.

The mobilization order is said to have raised concerns in Russia that some people of combat age may not be allowed to leave the country. According to data from Aviasales, the most popular airline ticketing website in Russia, most of the flights leaving Russia were sold out a few hours after Putin issued the encouragement order.

Finnish Defense Minister Antti Kaikkonen said on September 21 that the country was monitoring the situation in Russia.

Finnish border guards also warned about a number of posts and videos on social media claiming that there was a 35 km long line of vehicles on the Russian border to Finland and that Russians were “waiting for hours”. “The situation on the Russian-Finnish border has remained essentially unchanged. Some of the videos circulating on social media have been pre-recorded and taken out of context,” the Finnish Border Guard said.

Soelve Solhein, in charge of immigration control at the Finnmark region police in northern Norway, said there was “no change” regarding the number of Russians entering the Nordic country.

The Baltic states have announced that they will not accept or grant asylum to Russians who want to avoid the mobilization order.

“Latvia will not issue humanitarian visas or other visas to Russian citizens who wish to avoid the mobilization order,” Latvian Foreign Minister Edgars Rinkevics announced on Twitter on September 21, citing “security reasons”.

Lithuanian Foreign Minister Gabrielius Landsbergis said on the same day that the country did not intend to accommodate Russian citizens who applied for a visa on “humanitarian grounds”. All visa procedures for Russians are handled “as usual”.

Lithuania has upgraded its military’s rapid response readiness to “prevent any provocations from the Russian side”. “Since Russia’s maneuvering order applies to Kaliningrad, Lithuania cannot just watch,” Lithuanian Defense Minister Arvydas Anusauskas said, referring to Russia’s overseas territory located between Lithuania and Poland.

Meanwhile, Estonian Prime Minister Kaja Kallas said the country does not accept Russians who dodged the order to deploy. The Russian people “are all responsible” for the actions of their national government. They should express their opposition to Moscow’s actions in Ukraine instead of seeking asylum abroad, Kallas said in an interview. CNN.





Russia and Finland share a common border of 1,340 km.  Graphics: BBC.

Russia and Finland share a common border of 1,340 km. Graphics: BBC.

Like Tam (Theo Reuters, RT)

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