German minister advises people to reduce driving to increase pressure on Russia

German Economy Minister Habeck advised people to save energy from now on by reducing driving to reduce dependence on supplies from Russia.

“Every kilometer without driving makes it easier for us to get rid of our dependence on Russian energy supplies. We are also protecting the climate,” German Economy Minister Robert Habeck said in an interview. with Funke Media Group today.

According to Habeck, Germany can become less dependent on Russian energy supplies and increase pressure on Moscow if people reduce gasoline consumption by choosing to take the train or cycle whenever possible.

German Economy Minister Robert Habeck in Paris, France, on February 7.  Photo: Reuters.

German Economy Minister Robert Habeck in Paris, France, on February 7. Image: Reuters.

The German Economy Minister thinks that a 10% reduction in personal energy consumption is possible. He also suggested that employers can contribute to energy saving efforts by having employees work from home.

“Whenever possible, an employee can work from home about 1-2 days a week, initially on a voluntary basis,” added Mr Habeck.

Earlier, Peter Hauk, the agricultural official in the state of Baden-Wurttemberg, southwestern Germany, once suggested that people endure the cold and lower the temperature of the heater so that they can soon reject Russian energy.

Minister Habeck last month announced plans to quickly cut dependence on Russian energy, but still warned of dire consequences if the embargo on Russian oil and gas was immediately imposed. He estimates that Germany will no longer depend on Russian gas by mid-2024, if all goes well.

Gas from Russia, delivered to Germany via fixed pipelines, will be the most difficult source of energy for Berlin to eliminate. Germany currently imports 55% of Russian gas.

It also imports more than a third of its oil from Russia, much of which flows directly to refineries in the eastern states through a pipeline system dating back to the Cold War. Half of Germany’s coal also comes from Russia, but Berlin has recently found more sources of coal.

Pipelines that deliver Russian gas to Europe.  Graphics: Reuters.

Pipelines that deliver Russian gas to Europe. Graphics: Reuters.

Ngoc Anh (According to Reuters)

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