Journalist ‘died again and again’ under Taliban torture

AfghanistanThe Taliban fighters hit so hard that a reporter for the website EtilaatRoz thought he had died while being tortured in the Kabul police station for reporting on the protests.

“A Taliban gunman stepped on my head and pressed my face to the concrete,” said Nemat Naqdi, 28, a camera reporter for the Afghan daily EtilaatRoz, of the moment the Taliban intervened as he photographed the protest. love in Kabul on September 8.

Naqdi and video editor Taqi Daryabi, 22, said they were taken to a police station by the Taliban and taken to a police station when they reported on women protesting against Pakistan’s involvement in Afghanistan and supporting feminism outside. outside the police station in Kabul.

Afghan journalists Neamatullah Naqdi (left) and Taqi Daryabi take pictures of their wounds at the EtilaatRoz daily newspaper office in Kabul, Afghanistan, on September 10.  Photo: AP.

Afghan journalists Neamatullah Naqdi (left) and Taqi Daryabi take pictures of their wounds at the EtilaatRoz daily newspaper office in Kabul, Afghanistan, on September 10. Photo: AP.

“They hit me with such force that I thought my life was over,” Naqdi said on September 10. “They hit my arm, I couldn’t move for two days after that. It’s much better now.”

This reporter said that his left eye was bruised and severely damaged, while his mind was ringing and he could not hear anything after being slapped 4-5 times in the face by the Taliban fighter.

When forced to face the floor, Naqdi pulled back from the pain and told them not to just hit his back, the group moved to hit Naqdi in the face, causing his face to bleed.

Naqdi felt his neck or back might break. “They were so violent that one person held my head and face, another hugged my waist. My hands and feet were tied,” he said.

Naqdi poses for a photo with a bandage on his face at the EtilaatRoz daily newspaper office on September 10.  Photo: AP.

Naqdi poses for a photo with a bandage on his face at the EtilaatRoz daily newspaper office on September 10. Photo: AP.

Daryabi said that the Taliban members continued to torture them for about 10 minutes. “They beat me with anything they could get their hands on,” he said, warning that “from now on the Taliban will threaten and torture journalists.”

“They stated in a press conference that journalists are licensed, but according to Islamic regulations. I believe that threat is still present. Journalists will not stop, they are part of it. other members of society, conveying the voice of the people. They become the voice of the people,” emphasized Daryabi.

Daryabi poses for a photo with injuries on his face and body at the Etilaatroz office in Kabul, Afghanistan on September 10.  Photo: AP.

Daryabi poses for a photo with injuries on his face and body at the Etilaatroz office in Kabul, Afghanistan on September 10. Photo: AP.

The Taliban has not yet commented on the reports of the two journalists being tortured.

Zaki Daryabi, editor-in-chief of EtilaatRoz, said he hoped the Taliban leadership would speak out against the constant and brutal torture of journalists and take punitive action against the militants involved.

Nemat Naqdi and Taqi Daryabi were among at least 14 journalists detained for two days while covering the protests in Kabul, according to the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ). At least six of these journalists were “beaten during arrest or detention”.

“The Taliban must immediately cease the detention of journalists in Afghanistan, end the use of violence against them, and allow the media to operate freely, without fear of reprisal,” CPJ said in a statement.

Protests took place in the Dasht-i-Barchi area in Kabul, mainly inhabited by the Shia Hazara ethnic minority, believed to be a target of the Taliban in the past. Some protesters were also arrested, but the number is unknown.

Witnesses estimated crowds at the protests to range from 300 to 500, one of the largest since the Taliban took control of Kabul.

Huyen Le (Follow CNN)

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