Philippines stormy storm

After typhoon Con Son swept through, leaving at least one person dead and 17 missing, the Philippines is preparing to welcome the big storm Chanthu.

Tropical Storm Con Son hit the Philippines’ central eastern province of Samar on September 6 before weakening and sweeping across the archipelago, forcing more than 10,000 people to evacuate, the Philippine National Risk Reduction and Management Council today. notification.

The Philippine Coast Guard evacuates people and livestock as Typhoon Con Son makes landfall in a village in Naic town, Cavite province, southwest of Manila, on September 8.  Photo: AFP

The Philippine Coast Guard evacuates people and livestock as Typhoon Con Son makes landfall in a village in Naic town, Cavite province, southwest of Manila, on September 8. Photo: AFP

Mark Timbal, a spokesman for the council, said one person drowned due to heavy rain in the island province of Marinduque. Two other deaths in Masbate province have not been confirmed by the authorities.

At least 17 people, mostly fishermen, are missing. Typhoon Con Son also caused flooding in provinces around the capital Manila and communities in the central Philippines.

As soon as Con Son passed, the Philippines was preparing to deal with Typhoon Chanthu with maximum winds of up to 195 km/h, which was moving over the western sea and towards the northeastern tip of the country, causing heavy rain and flooding. . Chanthu is expected to sweep across Cagayan province on September 10, bringing “heavy and at times torrential” rain in the area, before continuing north, toward the island of Taiwan.

Darwin Sacramed, an official with Cagayan province’s disaster response agency, said people living in rickety houses had been warned to evacuate before Chanthu made landfall.

The direction of typhoon Chanthu is predicted by the Taiwan Weather Bureau.  Graphics: TT

The direction of typhoon Chanthu is predicted by the Taiwan Weather Bureau. Graphics: TT

The Philippines experiences an average of 20 typhoons each year. Scientists say that as the ocean surface warms due to climate change, storms will become stronger, bringing more water vapor, posing a greater threat to coastal communities around the world. The deadliest typhoon in the Philippines was Super Typhoon Haiyan in 2013, leaving more than 7,300 people dead or missing.

Hong Hanh (Follow AFP)

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