Russian submarine fleet specializes in searching for plane wrecks

The Russian Navy operates at least two mother submarines that can deploy specialized submersibles to search for aircraft wrecks and warships on the seabed.

British National Security Adviser Stephen Lovegrove said on December 1 that British experts had identified the remains of an F-35B fighter jet on the Mediterranean Sea floor, after it crashed while taking off from an aircraft carrier. fly HMS Queen Elizabeth.

Lovegrove also warned against the possibility of Russia monitoring the salvage process, saying that this country possesses advanced submersibles with many modern features, forcing Britain to take many precautions to ensure the secret of the ships. technology on the F-35 series.

Military expert HI Sutton also said that Russia is heavily investing in a dedicated submarine fleet in the context of increased competition in the submarine field with the US.

“Russia is the only country with a fleet of submarines specializing in undersea warfare and reconnaissance and is expanding this capacity. Other countries such as the US also possess good submarine warfare capabilities, but mainly. rely on multitasking platforms, not dedicated submarines,” Sutton said.

This expert said that Russia’s dedicated submarine fleet includes two large mother submarines, which can carry one or two deep submersibles specialized in secret missions on the seabed, including shafts with aircraft wrecks or battleship.

This fleet includes submarines BS-64, variant of the Project 667BDRM class with a displacement of 18,200 tons when submerged, and Belgorod, of the Project 949A class with a displacement of up to 30,000 tons. The two submarines in June carried out a number of sea trials.

Simulation of the BS-64 submarine structure of the Russian Navy.  Graphics: HI Sutton.

Simulation of the BS-64 submarine structure of the Russian Navy. Graphics: H. I. Sutton.

“The size and complexity of the dedicated submarine speaks to the importance and level of Russian investment in this fleet,” Sutton said. “Deep-submersibles are built on the basis of classes of nuclear-powered submarines, the most prominent of which are Paltus and Losharik, which are compatible with BS-64.”

These submarines are under the management of the Deep Sea Research Service (GUGI) of the Russian Defense Ministry, which is said to be responsible for the tasks related to undersea communication and sensor networks, submarine rescue. Their equally important mission is to search for wrecks of ships or aircraft on the seabed, as well as conduct oil and gas exploration.

In July 2019, a fire broke out on the Losharik submarine, killing 14 Russian officers and sailors. Satellite image taken by Capella Space on November 16 shows Losharik being moved into a warehouse for further repairs over the winter.

Nearby is a Project 1910 Kashalot submersible, which is said to be a possible replacement for the Losharik thanks to its similar deep diving capabilities. However, the Kashalot-class subs are not designed to be carried by mother submarines and it is not clear if they have been converted or upgraded to do so.

In addition to a fleet of deep-diving submarines, GUGI also owns many surface ships specializing in ocean floor exploration, including the research ship Yantar carrying two deep-sea submersibles. This ship has appeared many times near undersea Internet fiber optic cables and similar infrastructure.

The Losharik and Kashalot submarines at the Russian naval base in Severodvinsk on November 16.  Photo: Capella Space.

The Losharik and Kashalot submarines at the Russian naval base in Severodvinsk on November 16. Photo: Capella Space.

Nguyen Tien (Follow LIP)

.

Leave a Comment