Weird Afghan women’s suits: Eyes must be blindfolded to go to school, big fears over Taliban’s promise of ‘fairness to women’

Recently, the Taliban held a women’s march on September 11. The thing is, the women there, they wear black robes with hoods that cover their faces, covering their eyes. A dress code is fraught with extremes and has raised concerns about the Taliban’s claim to be fair to women to study and work.

Strange clothes of Afghan women: Must cover their eyes to go to school, great concern about the Taliban's promise of justice for women - Photo 1.

The strange clothes given by the Taliban in Afghanistan

Specifically, a group of women wearing black robes, hats and gloves attended a lecture at Kabul University on September 11, with the content of promoting the Taliban’s educational policy and downplaying the views of the Taliban. inverse.

“In Western society, we see how much they believe in their self-worth and defend it. They can’t even stand the fact that Muslim women wear hijabs,” – a female speaker spoke up.

The speaker also said that the women who have marched against the Taliban regulations recently “does not represent Afghan women”. “They only pursue their own self-interest, in the name of giving it to Afghan women.”

“Strange” costumes

The costumes used on 9/11 attracted the attention of the public. Because wearing a hood over the eyes is a rarity in Afghanistan, even at the strictest religious events elsewhere. During their first control of Afghanistan between 1996 and 2001, women were forced to wear blue burqas – tops covered from head to toe, including gauze covering the eyes. Or as in Iraq and Syria in the period 2014 – 2019 under the Islamic State, women also had to wear black niqab and gloves, but their eyes were still open.

The strange clothes of Afghan women: Must cover their eyes to go to school, great concern about the Taliban's promise of fairness to women - Photo 2.

Abdul Baqi Haqqani, the Taliban’s education minister, said on September 12 that he intends to keep universities open to girls, as long as they wear hijabs. However, Haqqani does not refer to such headscarves or veils covering the eyes.

In addition, Haqqani affirmed that it would completely ban men and women from studying together under the Taliban.

“We have no problem ending the education system or the gender. We’re all Muslims, and they’ll accept that,” he said. – Haqqani said.

Previously, the Taliban had repeatedly pledged to ensure education and rights for women, but “within the framework of Islamic law”. Still, activists and academics warn that ending bisexual classes will lead to shortages in staff and facilities, as there aren’t enough female staff to meet the new regulations.

Strange clothes of Afghan women: Must cover their eyes to go to school, great concern about the Taliban's promise of justice for women - Photo 3.

Haqqani denies this, arguing that the country has a sufficient number of female employees, and will only have a timely replenishment. “Everything depends on the responsiveness of the schools. We can also use male teachers to teach behind a curtain, or apply technology.”

An unnamed female activist in Kabul said every promise the Taliban made was a lie. Students are being forced to stay at home because schools don’t know how to meet the new regulation.

Join or Expel

Numerous rallies with fully clothed women took place in Kabul and Kandahar over the weekend. It was a move by the Taliban against the women-led opposition marches.

But not everyone participates voluntarily. Natiq Malikzada, a local journalist, said a woman participating in the march told him that the Taliban forced many students to do the same. “If you don’t attend, you’ll be expelled, and never go to school again,” – Malikzada recounted.

The strange clothes of Afghan women: Must cover their eyes to go to school, great concern about the Taliban's promise of fairness to women - Photo 4.

Pictures of the marches have drawn criticism on social media. Many Afghan women have posted photos in the country’s traditional dress (with eyes open, of course), along with the hashtag “DoNotTouchMyClothes (Don’t Touch My Clothes).

“This is the culture of Afghanistan. We are wearing traditional Afghan clothes,” – said Bahar Jalai, an angry scholar. Some claimed that they had never seen a garment with such a hood over the eyes, even in the most religiously conservative areas of Afghanistan.

Over the weekend, Taliban gunmen cracked down heavily on those who marched against the regulation – mainly women. Some journalists and reporters were arrested, even tortured on the spot. Many of the gunmen used the excuse that women should not be on the street and not be filmed taking pictures of them. Others simply said that the protest was illegal because it had not been officially approved.

Strange clothes of Afghan women: Must cover their eyes to go to school, big concern about the Taliban's promise of fairness to women - Photo 5.

Hamid Karzai, the former president of Afghanistan who chose to stay in Kabul when the old government collapsed, said he spoke privately with the Taliban to urge them to find ways to preserve the 20-year achievements in women’s education. “For me, the regulation on the hijab – which is what Afghan women would wear – is enough. There shouldn’t be a stricter regulation.”

Source: Telegraph

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