Women show off their beautiful clothes to protest the Taliban

Afghan women around the world protested the Taliban’s dress code for college girls by posting photos of them dressed up on social media.

The Taliban government on September 11 announced a new rule for female university students, requiring them to wear a headscarf and not study with boys under Islamic Sharia law.

After the image of schoolgirls wearing black clothes covering their faces, holding white Taliban flags, sitting in a university lecture hall in Kabul and listening to pro-Taliban speeches was published on September 11, Afghan women everywhere. The world posted photos wearing colorful traditional costumes to protest.

Waslat Hasrat-Nazimi, head of the DW News bureau in Afghanistan.  Photo: Twitter/Waslat Hasrat-Nazimi

Waslat Hasrat-Nazimi, head of the DW News bureau in Afghanistan. Photo: Twitter/Waslat Hasrat-Nazimi

Bahar Jajali, a former American university lecturer in Afghanistan, has launched a photo campaign. Jajali posted on Twitter a photo of a woman wearing a black dress and a black veil with the caption: “There has never been a woman dressed like this in the history of Afghanistan. It is completely foreign to Afghan culture. I posted the photo. I wear traditional Afghan clothes to speak out, educate and dispel the misinformation that the Taliban are propagating.”

Many Afghan women responded. Waslat Hasrat-Nazimi, head of DW News’ Afghanistan office, posted a picture of himself wearing a traditional Afghan dress and hat with the comment: “This is Afghan culture and how Afghan women dress.”

Female college students listen to a lecture in the Shaheed Rabbani College of Education auditorium in Kabul on September 11.  Photo: AFP

Female college students listen to a lecture in the Shaheed Rabbani College of Education auditorium in Kabul on September 11. Photo: AFP

Sodaba Haidare, a BBC journalist, emphasizes that Afghan women like to be colorful. “Even our rice is colorful, so is the national flag,” she wrote.

And Peymana Assad, a local politician of Afghan origin in the UK, posted on social media: “Our cultural clothing is not the kind of black and ghost-like clothes that the Taliban force women to wear.”

Sodaba Haidare, BBC journalist.  Photo: Twitter/Sodaba Haidare

Sodaba Haidare, BBC journalist. Photo: Twitter / Sodaba Haidare

Shekiba Teimori, an Afghan singer and women’s rights activist who fled Kabul last month, said “the headscarves were still in use before the fall of Kabul. We still see women wearing headscarves, but the headscarves are still in use. It’s up to the family to decide, not the government to force it.” Before the arrival of the Taliban, she said, her ancestors wore “colorful dresses like the Afghan dress you see me wearing”.

Hong Hanh (Follow CNN)

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